Sober Pride Denver 2019

reposted from Slutblog by AmberRose
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This year’s Denver Sober Pride – The Phoenix June 15 7-11p

We all know Pride Weekend is like gay Saint Patrick’s Day when it comes to drugs, alcohol and general debauchery. No judgement – debauchery is fun. But for those of us who don’t choose to imbibe or for those of us who are struggling to stay sober, Pride can be a huge trigger. Rather than avoiding Pride altogether, embracing Pride sober can make you feel more engaged, more proud, and more focused on the true purpose of coming together as a community (spoiler alert: that purpose is not rainbow jello-shots.)

Pride, as we know, began as a commemoration of the Stonewall Riots of June 1969. As we also know, alcohol companies see big dollar signs at Pride – beer and vodka brands like Miller Brewing and Smirnoff sponsor floats, performances, parties, after parties, and after-after parties. While Pride might be a party now, Pride started as a riot.

Excessive alcohol consumption and the nonstop carefree hedonism can both distract from the inherently political statement of Pride, and also hides the fact that many members of our community (approximately 25% versus 9% of the cis-het population according to a recent study) suffer from substance abuse.

So, how do you survive AND have fun at Pride without falling (or jumping) off the wagon?

Use the (sober) buddy system

Bring a sober friend to the event with you – they don’t have to be sober or in recovery, they can just decide to be sober for a night with you. Even the most daunting tasks are easier when you’ve got someone by your side.

Check out a meeting

Before you head to Pride, attend an AA, harm-reduction or support group meeting and get some support from your sober family. If you can, check in with your sponsor. Spending some time to get re-grounded before facing the chaos of Pride weekend will help remind you that you’re not alone.

Look f*cking dope

When you look bomb dot com, you exude confidence. Spending a little more time priming pays off majorly. Plus, it always feels good to end the night looking as fly as you did when you started, and it feels even better to wake up the next morning fresh as a daisy and hangover free.

Dance your ass off

Pride parties are parties – whether you’re drinking or doing drugs, it’s still a party dammit so have some fun! Dance like crazy, and better yet ask a cutie to dance. Smooch on a rooftop. Watch the sunrise. Just because you’re sober doesn’t mean the party has to be lame.

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With Justice and Liberty For …

 

Posted by Merlin Karst

Federal passage of the FIRST STEP Act provides action on criminal justice reform. Ultimately, the FIRST STEP Act is one step in the right direction for reducing mass incarceration in the United States. The Second Chance Act re-authorization was recently included in the FIRST STEP Act. It is obvious we can’t arrest our way out of the current addiction epidemic, nor can there be wholesale “get out of jail free” cards issued. The focus will be the supervision and instruction on how to “stay out of jail,” and, if on probation, to make it the last probation ever to be served. The fact remains that crime and public safety concerns generated by addictive behavior will continue to be addressed within the justice system. In fact, research confirms the criminal justice system can serve to motivate offenders to change behavior, and, in many cases, overcome addiction. Programs can provide reason and resources to reduce recidivism. They provide education and information to guide positive, life-changing behaviors. Probationers and/or those under drug court supervision spend a truly teachable time on a tether.

The justice system’s infrastructure program, outside of and beyond incarceration, must include effective use of supervision, education, and motivational recovery and supported through community connections. It must reinforce the value of services like peer-to-peer programs, skills training, and supportive housing. Communities across the country are working to implement innovative programs within the justice system to overcome the resistance of those served to be served — even under threat of incarceration and the continued misery and chaos of addiction affecting themselves, family, and community. Fortunately the value of Medically Assisted Treatment and Recovery is recognized in overcoming craving and providing relief from the agony of withdrawal. With the absence of both, the brain begins to be receptive to positive behavioral change.
I recently participated in a Webinar titled “Utilizing Peer Support in Probation Programs.” This was sponsored by Faces and Voices of Recovery and moderated by its Executive Director, Patty McCarthy Metcalf, and Susan Broderick, Board Chairwoman of The Phoenix. It featured an innovative approach to probation in Denver. The primary presenters were: Scott J. Prendergast, the Probation Manager for Denver Adult Probation, whose job duties include assisting in the development, implementation, and oversight of policies, procedures, and special programs — including the Specialized Drug Offender Program (SDOP); and Steve D’Ascoli, CAC III who has been with Mile High Behavioral Healthcare for nine years. That and other agencies provide treatment and recovery support services for the SDOP. Scott outlined some of the dramatic changes made through the SDOP. Beginning with a check on situational reality and review of rules and protocols, recognizing the fact that most probationers did not have transportation, cellphone, money, and/or housing. In the throes of drug abuse or addiction, they feared the pain of withdrawal more than jail. They saw no motivation or hope for sobriety. The probation department, faced with limited resources and looking beyond past practices, developed a program based on consideration, connections, and community. The Drug Courts also play a critical role in the process, providing a path through the justice system to liberties for offenders and families.

One important change to support consideration, convenience, and compliance is that drug tests (UAs) are required but on a set schedule rather than at random. They established partnerships with treatment and recovery support providers. Also, the department established a close and critical relationship with Denver Health. In a take it to ‘em approach, probation officers are encouraged to meet with probationers at the provider facilities. An important partner is The Phoenix. It offers a free sober active community to individuals who have suffered from a substance use disorder and who choose a sober life. They use a peer support model. The officer and probationer may go to The Phoenix to workout and communicate. Probationers meet in a group, form quasi-communities, and meet with peers. Peers have the lived experience of going thorough probation and living a healthy life without drugs. Peers make positive connections. Peers reduce fears, give hope, and show them how to dig in with dignity. Ritual and fellowship provide the sticking stuff. With the probationers’ sense of connection, community, and confidence, the success of the program has been outstanding. It has reduced recidivism and improved recovery outcomes for the probationers seeking hope, health, and a life with liberties and to those who support and encourage them, Scott bases his approach on this quotation “I’ve learned that people will forget what you said, people will forget what you did, but people will never forget how you made them feel.”  Maya Angelou

 

Sober Pride 2019

Out, Proud & Sober – How To Have Fun At Pride Without Liquor

reposted from Slutblog by AmberRose
3EF4DED5-4DEE-45A6-A40A-2D4488F1C009

 

 

This year’s Denver Sober Pride – The Phoenix June 15 7-11p

We all know Pride Weekend is like gay Saint Patrick’s Day when it comes to drugs, alcohol and general debauchery. No judgment – debauchery is fun. But for those of us who don’t choose to imbibe or for those of us who are struggling to stay sober, Pride can be a huge trigger. Rather than avoiding Pride altogether, embracing Pride sober can make you feel more engaged, more proud, and more focused on the true purpose of coming together as a community (spoiler alert: that purpose is not rainbow jello-shots.)

Pride, as we know, began as a commemoration of the Stonewall Riots of June 1969. As we also know, alcohol companies see big dollar signs at Pride – beer and vodka brands like Miller Brewing and Smirnoff sponsor floats, performances, parties, after parties, and after-after parties. While Pride might be a party now, Pride started as a riot.

Excessive alcohol consumption and the nonstop carefree hedonism can both distract from the inherently political statement of Pride, and also hides the fact that many members of our community (approximately 25% versus 9% of the cis-het population according to a recent study) suffer from substance abuse.

So, how do you survive AND have fun at Pride without falling (or jumping) off the wagon?

Use the (sober) buddy system

Bring a sober friend to the event with you – they don’t have to be sober or in recovery, they can just decide to be sober for a night with you. Even the most daunting tasks are easier when you’ve got someone by your side.

Check out a meeting

Before you head to Pride, attend an AA, harm-reduction or support group meeting and get some support from your sober family. If you can, check in with your sponsor. Spending some time to get re-grounded before facing the chaos of Pride weekend will help remind you that you’re not alone.

Look f*cking dope

When you look bomb dot com, you exude confidence. Spending a little more time priming pays off majorly. Plus, it always feels good to end the night looking as fly as you did when you started, and it feels even better to wake up the next morning fresh as a daisy and hangover free.

Dance your ass off

Pride parties are parties – whether you’re drinking or doing drugs, it’s still a party dammit so have some fun! Dance like crazy, and better yet ask a cutie to dance. Smooch on a rooftop. Watch the sunrise. Just because you’re sober doesn’t mean the party has to be lame.

https://videopress.com/embed/vxhmFqOx?hd=0&autoPlay=0&permalink=0&loop=0

Vid from Denver Sober Pride 2018-

There’s always time for a mocktail

Sometimes it seems like other people are more comfortable with you not drinking than you are. The easiest way to get people off your case is to have your favorite non-alcoholic drink in hand. It puts other people at ease, deters they “hey why aren’t you drinking?” question, and gives you something to do with your hands. If plain seltzer water isn’t your gig, ask for soda water with bitters and a lime, or cran-pineapple-seltzer in a champagne glass.

Get your story straight

Speaking of other people being more uncomfortable with you drinking than you are, it can help to have an answer prepared when people ask why you’re not drinking. My default is “I’m on a super-strong antibiotic” because it tends to stop the convo there.

HALT

HALT stands for Hungry, Angry, Lonely, Tired. Any of these feelings can trigger a relapse (or just a major moody meltdown). If you’re out and suddenly feel like you need to pound a tray of shots, check in with yourself and assess if you need to call a friend, take a nap, eat something, get some water, or simply go home.

Have an exit strategy

Speaking of going home, don’t forget this is always a viable option. If you need to pull a French exit (my signature party trick), go for it but please remember to text your friends and tell them you left, so they don’t worry. It can also help to have a reason why you need to suddenly bolt from the bar – I usually go with “my heels are killing me” or “I left a candle burning” but “Taco Bell closes in 30 minutes” works too.

Remember why you’re celebrating

The purpose of Pride is to come together as a community, and as a united front. The first Pride was a riot for our rights, led by black and brown trans women, drag queens and street queers. Honor their legacy, and remember why we’re still marching today. Even better, get involved! Support your community by volunteering, rallying, organizing, marching, and supporting queer artists and activists.

In Others’ Words

 

change

by Merlyn Karst

In previous blogs I have suggested that when I’m at a loss for words— doesn’t happen often— I use the words of others. The act of messaging is quite satisfying. I am reading a book by friend and mentor, Johnny Allem, titled Say The Second Thing—That Comes Into Your Mind. This book is a “tool box” that supports the work and joy of recovery.  I know that recovery support for self and others is not a job but requires work. In describing his early days, Johnny writes about the tools of work. “In high school I learned to repair radios and appliances … my habit of respecting tools and keeping them in assigned places became very useful.” Ironically, my father also repaired radios and household appliances and had appropriate tools for the task. He wired houses during the depression and made all the electrical connections without the benefit of power tools.  I still have some of those tools, now 90 years old.  Johnny writes, “On my journey, I have come to realize that we are hard wired to belong to each other, to connect with each other and share a common spiritual calling.” I agree that we may be hard wired, but it is now a wireless world. Our wireless platform may well be fellowship.

 

Though I am sensitive to political correctness, my “PCs” of today are to pursue connections, preserve connections, and protect connections.  “Cs” the day with action through Contact, Connection, Conversation, Communication, and Community—with Courage. In Johnny’s tool book, he has a chapter titled “Today Matters.” He writes, “Today is game day. It is the only time to put points on the board. When the measure of our lives is totaled, it will be our actions that count. Not our wishes, not our opinions, not our intentions.”

 

I was privileged to be with Johnny Allem and Bill White in St Paul in 2001 when we and almost 200 others made a commitment to faces and voices proclaiming the reality of recovery. Bill White wrote and reflected on that occasion with a question: “How can addicted people experience hope when the legions of recovering people in this culture are not seen or heard?  Where is the proof that permanent recovery from addiction is possible?  We need a vanguard of recovering people to send an unequivocal message to those still drug enslaved that they can be free.  We need a vanguard willing to stand as the LIVING PROOF of that proposition….”

 

Bill wrote in a more recent blog, “Those words were shared in 2001 in the belief that contact strategies, even more than education and protest strategies, would be crucial to dismantling the stigma attached to addiction recovery.  We still believe that, and, needless to say, we are delighted to see research confirming the power of recovery disclosure as a strategy for social change.  What would be the state of LGBT quality of life in the U.S. if all members of that community had remained hidden in the closet these past decades?”  Early in the life of Faces and Voices of Recovery, a now large and growing recovery movement, I spoke to an audience at a reunion of alumni of a treatment center. Many were in recovery, along with family members. I spoke of the courage of those in the LBGT community who came out and came up to overcome stigma and discrimination and gained the power of purpose and presence for millions. Afterwards, a woman approached me and with a passionate plea asked. “Mr. Karst, when do we have our own ribbon? “ Symbols are great but nothing beats the power of story.  As I referenced earlier, Bill White spoke of the importance of a “contact strategy” and we have learned, though not related to athleticism, recovery support is certainly a contact sport.

 

Johnny Allem was the 2016 recipient of the William L. White Lifetime Achievement Award of Faces and Voices of Recovery. He pioneered Recovery Ambassadorship. His book should be sought at local bookstores and is available through Amazon. Bill White is a well-known author of a multitude of papers and several books. He is a regular contributor to the Faces and Voices of Recovery blog site. I’m grateful for the words from these significant others for the messages.

 

Effective Peer Supervision Learning CoHort

MT Embark Superv Collaboration Cohort

Embark/ PCA Colorado initiated a learning collaborative with 10 other Colorado organizations and Meaningful Trainings from NY intending to create a base of information to provide insight new peer supervisors as they develop their programs. As the Peer Workforce grows into existing healthcare organizations, it is no doubt a challenge to incorporate non-clinical strategies into existing clinical programs without some confusion and drift.

Furthermore, it is becoming more and more apparent that the services that peers provide are instrumental in attaining sustained recovery. These are outcomes that will cost our communities much less as time goes on. The warm-hand offs that peers can deliver may just be a game-changer for the treatment continuum.

We held the 1st training on Dec 3rd in Denver. 18 individuals participated. The days flew by. We parted and agreed to regather in the new year to engage the in the online collaborative portion. We reconvene next Monday for our 1st of 3 calls.

Our plan is to deliver another Peer Supervision workshop in September. Send us a note if you are interested in participating in the September workshop at info@pcacolorado.com

 

 

The Artist’s Way- Boutique Vintage Recovery Pathway

Julia Cameron Wants You to Do Your Morning Pages

Re posted from the NY Times written by Penelope Green

With “The Artist’s Way,” Julia Cameron invented the way people renovate the creative soul.

SANTA FE, N.M. — On any given day, someone somewhere is likely leading an Artist’s Way group, gamely knocking back the exercises of “The Artist’s Way” book, the quasi-spiritual manual for “creative recovery,” as its author Julia Cameron puts it, that has been a lodestar to blocked writers and other artistic hopefuls for more than a quarter of a century. There have been Artist’s Way clusters in the Australian outback and the Panamanian jungle; in Brazil, Russia, the United Kingdom and Japan; and also, as a cursory scan of Artist’s Way Meetups reveals, in Des Moines and Toronto. It has been taught in prisons and sober communities, at spiritual retreats and New Age centers, from Esalen to Sedona, from the Omega Institute to the Open Center, where Ms. Cameron will appear in late March, as she does most years. Adherents of “The Artist’s Way” include the authors Patricia Cornwell and Sarah Ban Breathnach. Pete Townshend, Alicia Keys and Helmut Newton have all noted its influence on their work.

So has Tim Ferriss, the hyperactive productivity guru behind “The Four Hour Workweek,” though to save time he didn’t actually read the book, “which was recommended to me by many megaselling authors,” he writes. He just did the “Morning Pages,” one of the book’s central exercises. It requires you write three pages, by hand, first thing in the morning, about whatever comes to mind. (Fortunes would seem to have been made on the journals printed to support this effort.) The book’s other main dictum is the “Artist’s Date” — two hours of alone time each week to be spent at a gallery, say, or any place where a new experience might be possible.

Elizabeth Gilbert, who has “done” the book three times, said there would be no “Eat, Pray, Love,” without “The Artist’s Way.” Without it, there might be no adult coloring books, no journaling fever. “Creativity” would not have its own publishing niche or have become a ubiquitous buzzword — the “fat-free” of the self-help world — and business pundits would not deploy it as a specious organizing principle.

 

The book’s enduring success — over 4 million copies have been sold since its publication in 1992 — have made its author, a shy Midwesterner who had a bit of early fame in the 1970s for practicing lively New Journalism at the Washington Post and Rolling Stone, among other publications, and for being married, briefly, to Martin Scorsese, with whom she has a daughter, Domenica — an unlikely celebrity. With its gentle affirmations, inspirational quotes, fill-in-the-blank lists and tasks — write yourself a thank-you letter, describe yourself at 80, for example — “The Artist’s Way” proposes an egalitarian view of creativity: Everyone’s got it.

 

The book promises to free up that inner artist in 12 weeks. It’s a template that would seem to reflect the practices of 12-step programs, particularly its invocations to a higher power. But according to Ms. Cameron, who has been sober since she was 29, “12 weeks is how long it takes for people to cook.”

Now 70, she lives in a spare adobe house in Santa Fe, overlooking an acre of scrub and the Sangre de Cristo mountain range. She moved a few years ago from Manhattan, following an exercise from her book to list 25 things you love. As she recalled, “I wrote juniper, sage brush, chili, mountains and sky and I said, ‘This is not the Chrysler Building.’” On a recent snowy afternoon, Ms. Cameron, who has enormous blue eyes and a nimbus of blonde hair, admitted to the jitters before this interview. “I asked three friends to pray for me,” she said. “I also wrote a note to myself to be funny.”

In the early 1970s, Ms. Cameron, who is the second oldest of seven children and grew up just north of Chicago, was making $67 a week working in the mail room of the Washington Post. At the same time, she was writing deft lifestyle pieces for the paper — like an East Coast Eve Babitz. “With a byline, no one knows you’re just a gofer,” she said.

In her reporting, Ms. Cameron observed an epidemic of green nail polish and other “Cabaret”-inspired behaviors in Beltway bars, and slyly reviewed a new party drug, methaqualone. She was also, by her own admission, a blackout drunk. “I thought drinking was something you did and your friends told you about it later,” she said. “In retrospect, in cozy retrospect, I was in trouble from my first drink.”

 

She met Mr. Scorsese on assignment for Oui magazine and fell hard for him. She did a bit of script-doctoring on “Taxi Driver,” and followed the director to Los Angeles. “I got pregnant on our wedding night,” she said. “Like a good Catholic girl.” When Mr. Scorsese took up with Liza Minnelli while all three were working on “New York, New York,” the marriage was done. (She recently made a painting depicting herself as a white horse and Mr. Scorsese as a lily. “I wanted to make a picture about me and Marty,” she said. “He was magical-seeming to me and when I look at it I think, ‘Oh, she’s fascinated, but she doesn’t understand.’”)

Under the pines.CreditRamsay de Give for The New York Times

In her memoir, “Floor Sample,” published in 2006, Ms. Cameron recounts the brutality of Hollywood, of her life there as a screenwriter and a drunk. Pauline Kael, she writes, described her as a “pornographic Victorian valentine, like a young Angela Lansbury.” Don’t marry her for tax reasons, Ms. Kael warns Mr. Scorsese. Andy Warhol, who escorts her to the premiere of “New York, New York,” inscribes her into his diary as a “lush.” A cocaine dealer soothes her — “You have a tiny little wife’s habit” — and a doctor shoos her away from his hospital when she asks for help, telling her she’s no alcoholic, just a “sensitive young woman.” She goes into labor in full makeup and a Chinese dressing gown, vowing to be “no trouble.”

“I think it’s fair to say that drinking and drugs stopped looking like a path to success,” she said. “So I luckily stopped. I had a couple of sober friends and they said, ‘Try and let the higher power write through you.’ And I said, What if he doesn’t want to?’ They said, ‘Just try it.’”

So she did. She wrote novels and screenplays. She wrote poems and musicals. She wasn’t always well-reviewed, but she took the knocks with typical grit, and she schooled others to do so as well. “I have unblocked poets, lawyers and painters,” she said. She taught her tools in living rooms and classrooms — “if someone was dumb enough to lend us one,” she said — and back in New York, at the Feminist Art Institute. Over the years, she refined her tools, typed them up, and sold Xeroxed copies in local bookstores for $20. It was her second husband, Mark Bryan, a writer, who needled her into making the pages into a proper book.

The first printing was about 9,000 copies, said Joel Fotinos, formerly the publisher at Tarcher/Penguin, which published the book in 1992. There was concern that it wouldn’t sell. “Part of the reason,” Mr. Fotinos said, “was that this was a book that wasn’t like anything else. We didn’t know where to put it on the shelves — did it go in religion or self-help? Eventually there was a category called ‘creativity,’ and ‘The Artist’s Way’ launched it.” Now an editorial director at St. Martin’s Press, Mr. Fotinos said he is deluged with pitches from authors claiming they’ve written “the new Artist’s Way.”

“But for Julia, creativity was a tool for survival,” he said. “It was literally her medicine and that’s why the book is so authentic, and resonates with so many people.”

“I am my tool kits,” Ms. Cameron said.

And, indeed, “The Artist’s Way” is stuffed with tools: worksheets to be filled with thoughts about money, childhood games, old hurts; wish lists and exercises, many of which seem exhaustive and exhausting — “Write down any resistance, angers and fears,” e.g. — and others that are more practical: “Take a 20 minutes walk,” “Mend any mending” and “re-pot any pinched and languishing plants.” It anticipates the work of the indefatigable Gretchen Rubin, the happiness maven, if Ms. Rubin were a bit kinder but less Type-A.

“When I teach, it’s like watching the lights come on,” said Ms. Cameron. “My students don’t get lectured to. I think they feel safe. Rather than try and fix themselves, they learn to accept themselves. I think my work makes people autonomous. I feel like people fall in love with themselves.”

Anne Lamott, the inspirational writer and novelist, said that when she was teaching writing full-time, her own students swore by “The Artist’s Way.” “That exercise — three pages of automatic writing — was a sacrament for people,” Ms. Lamott wrote in a recent email. “They could plug into something bigger than the rat exercise wheel of self-loathing and grandiosity that every writer experiences: ‘This could very easily end up being an Oprah Book,’ or ‘Who do I think I’m fooling? I’m a subhuman blowhard.’”

“She’s given you an assignment that is doable, and I think it’s kind of a cognitive centering device. Like scribbly meditation,” Ms. Lamott wrote. “It’s sort of like how manicurists put smooth pebbles in the warm soaking water, so your fingers have something to do, and you don’t climb the walls.”

In the wild. Credit Ramsay de Give for The New York Times

Ms. Cameron continues to write her Morning Pages every day, even though she continues, as she said, to be grouchy upon awakening. She eats oatmeal at a local cafe and walks Lily, an eager white Westie. She reads no newspapers, or social media (perhaps the most grueling tenet of “The Artist’s Way” is a week of “reading deprivation”), though an assistant runs a Twitter and Instagram account on her behalf. She writes for hours, mostly musicals, collaborating with her daughter, a film director, and others.

Ms. Cameron may be a veteran of the modern self-care movement but her life has not been all moonbeams and rainbows, and it shows. She was candid in conversation, if not quite at ease. “So I haven’t proven myself to be hilarious,” she said with a flash of dry humor, adding that even after so many years, she still gets stage-fright before beginning a workshop.

She has written about her own internal critic, imagining a gay British interior designer she calls Nigel. “And nothing is ever good enough for Nigel,” she said. But she soldiers on.

She will tell you that she has good boundaries. But like many successful women, she brushes off her achievements, attributing her unlooked-for wins to luck.

“If you have to learn how to do a movie, you might learn from Martin Scorsese. If you have to learn about entrepreneurship, you might learn from Mark” — her second husband. “So I’m very lucky,” she said. “If I have a hard time blowing my own horn, I’ve been attracted to people who blew it for me.”

TRS- Telephone Recovery Support

2019 TRS Flyer

PCA will begin providing Telephone Recovery Support (TRS) calls to CO residents that are in recovery from alcohol or other addictions. TRS is an innovative, peer-to-peer support service we obtained from Connecticut Community for Addiction Recovery. Trained volunteers that are, in many cases, in recovery themselves, make weekly calls to “check in” and see how people are doing. Recoverees are offered support; encouragement and information about resources that may help them maintain their recovery.

The beauty is in the simplicity. TRS helps people stay in recovery. Sometimes just a phone call can make someone feel wanted, cared about and included. Dare, we say “loved”. When making the call, the volunteer will feel rewarded when they have spoken with someone. They share in joys and sorrows, triumphs and setbacks. They have the satisfaction of giving back, of making a difference. It’s a classic win-win scenario.

The impact on our state may be immeasurable. We know that our calls help people maintain their recovery and get them back on track if a relapse occurs. When someone tells us they have relapsed, we don’t kick them out of the program; we keep calling them, checking in with them, seeing if they want help. When someone is down, that’s when he or she needs the most support. PCA might become the only encouraging voice heard at a critical junction on the road of their recovery.

TRS calls are to be made in 5 Colorado counties as well as our partner Continuum Recovery Center of Colorado. Here are some results from CCAR’s 2016 annual report on TRS.

 

trs1trs2

If you are interested in giving or receiving calls please contact us a 800-604-8978.