Colorado- Is It in the Cards ?

Recovery support services are typically provided by paid staff or volunteers who are familiar with how their communities can support people seeking to live free of alcohol and drugs, and who are often peers of those seeking recovery. Recovery support services often include the following: • Substance use disorder education. •	 Family services, such as marriage counseling and parenting training. • Pre-employment counseling. •	 Case management. •	 Relapse prevention. •	 Face-to-face or telephone-based continuing care counseling. •	 Alcohol and drug testing • Outreach. •	 Individual services coordination, providing linkages to other services (e.g., legal services, Temporary Assistance for Needy Families, social services, food stamps). •	 Recovery coaching (e.g., stage-appropriate recovery education, assistance in recovery management, telephone monitoring). •	 Family support and child care. •	 Transportation to and from treatment, recovery support activities, employment, and other activities. •	 Supportive transitional drug-free housing services. •	 Self-help and support groups (e.g., 12-step groups, SMART Recovery, Women for Sobriety). • Spiritual support. • Employment coaching

Recovery support services are typically provided by
paid staff or volunteers who are familiar with how
their communities can support people seeking to live
free of alcohol and drugs, and who are often peers
of those seeking recovery. Recovery support services
often include the following:
• Substance use disorder education.
• Family services, such as marriage counseling and
parenting training.
• Pre-employment counseling.
• Case management.
• Relapse prevention.
• Face-to-face or telephone-based continuing care
counseling.
• Alcohol and drug testing
• Outreach.
• Individual services coordination, providing linkages
to other services (e.g., legal services, Temporary
Assistance for Needy Families, social services, food
stamps).
• Recovery coaching (e.g., stage-appropriate recovery
education, assistance in recovery management, telephone
monitoring).
• Family support and child care.
• Transportation to and from treatment, recovery support
activities, employment, and other activities.
• Supportive transitional drug-free housing services.
• Self-help and support groups (e.g., 12-step groups,
SMART Recovery, Women for Sobriety).
• Spiritual support.
• Employment coaching… more info at samhsa.gov

 

Today I realized that part of my quest must be to answer the following:

Where may I find the numbers that reflect the following information.
How many Coloradans are currently living with actively imbalanced behavioral health issues?
What are the breakdowns between MH/SUD?
How many of those are estimated to be dual affected?
How many of those could benefit from treatment?
How many individuals actually receive treatment?
What steps are being taken to offer services to more affected Coloradans?


Subsequently how is success measured in these treatment episodes?
What is the ratio of successful outcomes compared to treatment episodes provided at large? 
Is there a general point where treatment ends and aftercare(recovery support) begins? 

When the Colorado Block Grant RFP's are released how will Colorado measure success? 
What outcomes will be expected and how will those outcomes be measured?

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